einstein


 

 

 

Soaring upwards
Can be like reaching down

Pushing forward

Can be like pushing back

Going right

Can be like Going left

Within is within

All things begin

And end at the cross roads

–GraalBaum 2013

 

 

This world-mountain was Nizir to the Chaldeans, Olympus to the Greeks, Hara Berezaiti to the Persians of the Avesta, the later Alborz and Elburz; a transfer, as says Mme. Ragozin, of ‘mythical heavenly geography to the earth.’ This mountain—the solar hill of the Egyptians—we shall again refer to in the next two or three chapters. At its apex springs, the heaven tree on which the solar bird is perched. From its roots spring the waters of life—the celestial sea, which, rushing adown the firmament, supplies the ocean which circumscribes the earth or falls directly in rain. At their fountain these springs are guarded by a goddess. In Egypt Nut, the goddess of the oversea, leans from the branches of the heavenly persea and pours forth the celestial water. In the Vedas, Yama, lord of the waters, sits in the highest heaven in the midst of the heavenly ocean under the tree of life, which drops the nectar Soma, and here, on the ‘navel of the waters,’ matter first took form. In the Norse, the central tree Yggdrasil has at its roots the spring of knowledge guarded by the Norns, the northern Fates; two swans the parents of all those of earth, float there. In Chaldea the mighty tree of Eridu, centre of the world, springs by the waters. The Avesta gives a very complete picture—Iran is at the centre of the seven countries of the world; it was the first created, and so beautiful, that were it not that God has implanted in all men a love for their own land, all nations would crowd into this the loveliest land. To the east somewhere, but still at the centre of the world, rises the ‘Lofty Mountain,’ from which all the mountains of the earth have grown, ‘High Haraiti;’ at its

summit is the gathering place of waters, out of which spring the two trees, the heavenly Haoma (Soma), and another tree which bears all the seeds that germinate on earth. This heavenly mountain is called ‘Navel of Waters,’ for the fountain of all waters springs there, guarded by a majestic and beneficent goddess. In Buddhist accounts, the waters issue in four streams like the

Eden from this reservoir, and flow to the cardinal points, each making one complete circuit in its descent. In the Persian Bundahish there are two of these heavenly rivers flowing east and west. To the Hindus the Ganges is such a heavenly stream. ‘The stream of heaven was called by the Greeks Achelous.’ The Nile in Egypt, the Hoang-Ho in China, and the Jordan to the Jews, seem to have been celestial rivers. This mountain of heaven is often figured in Christian art with the four rivers issuing from under the Throne of God.

Sir John Maundeville gives an account of the earthly Paradise quite perfect in its detailed scheme. It is the highest place on earth, nearly reaching to the circle of the moon (as in Dante), and the flood did not reach it. ‘And in the highest place, exactly in the middle, is a well that casts out the four streams’—Ganges, Nile, Tigris, and Euphrates. ‘And men there beyond say that all the sweet waters of the world above and beneath take their beginning from the well of Paradise, and out of that well all water come and go.

 

http://www.sacred-texts.com/earth/amm/amm07.htm

 

http://chasinghermes.com/2009/04/24/08-axis-mundi.aspx

 

“The best portions of a good man’s life,

His little, nameless, unremembered acts,

Of kindness and love.”

 ~William Wordsworth

 

 

 

“If we choose the path of heart, then of course our focus is ultimately and always on love. Love is the cornerstone of many of the world’s religions, especially the mystic paths. Rebbe Nachman of Bratslav used to say that achieving the simplicity of love is one of the highest enlightenments…..

 

        When we speak of the heart, which is the lens of chesed (loving kindness), of course we speak of love. Love is the doorway to the soul. It is the consuming wisdom that arises when a person is connected to the source. It is the melody Nachman described as filling every leaf, every stone. Part of our task in meditation is to learn to hear this melody—and the more we hear it, the deeper it will resonate in our soul. The chesed that underpins the world is boundless. It is the very fabric of the world. This is reflected to the root word for love in Hebrew A-H-V. Normally we pronounce this word as ahavah, but the grammar of Hebrew (which is without vowels) permits us to break it down into two words: eh-hav, meaning ‘I will give.’ And love is being given constantly, though we may be closed to it.”

 

– Avram Davis (The Way of the Flame)

 

Albert Einstein was most precise:”Three great powers rule the world,” he said, “stupidity, fear and greed.”

How to interrupt this vicious circle? What tool shall we use, and where shall we insert it?

For me the Dalai Lama has marked the way: “My religion,” he said once, “is very simple. My religion is kindness.”

Kindness trumps greed: it asks for sharing. Kindness trumps fear: it calls forth gratefulness and love. Kindness trumps even stupidity, for with sharing and love, one learns.

Kindness is not on political agendas. Kindness is not on technological agendas. Why not? It’s inexpensive, simply understood and universally approved.

 

The twenty first century must feature kindness –to the earth and all its species –or there will be little hope for the twenty second.

 

–Marc Estrin

……………………

Creator of the universe

Preserve us from our own presumption

Do not let us close ourselves into ourselves

But open us continually into you.

 

Let us be more in love with You

Than with our notions of You

Let us stop claiming to know everything

So that we may understand something.

 

Increase in us kindness

Make us people who care

And who take care,

Who venerate the truth

And recognize each other.

 

Draw us with an irresistible beauty!

 

–Rabia Terri Harris (Muslim peace fellowship, New York)

 

 


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1. I want to know how God created this world. I am not interested in this or that phenomenon, in the spectrum of this or that element. I want to know His thoughts; the rest are details.

2. Science without religion is lame. Religion without science is blind.

3. My religion consists of a humble admiration of the illimitable superior spirit who reveals himself in the slight details we are able to perceive with our frail and feeble mind.

4. The further the spiritual evolution of mankind advances, the more certain it seems to me that the path to genuine religiosity does not lie through the fear of life, and the fear of death, and blind faith, but through striving after rational knowledge.

5. Every one who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that a spirit is manifest in the laws of the Universe-a spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble.

6. The scientists’ religious feeling takes the form of a rapturous amazement at the harmony of natural law, which reveals an intelligence of such superiority that, compared with it, all the systematic thinking and acting of human beings is an utterly insignificant reflection.

7. There is no logical way to the discovery of elemental laws. There is only the way of intuition, which is helped by a feeling for the order lying behind the appearance.

8. The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.

9. The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious; It is the source of all true art and science.

10. We should take care not to make the intellect our god; it has, of course, powerful muscles, but no personality.

11. Whoever undertakes to set himself up as a judge of Truth and Knowledge is shipwrecked by the laughter of the Gods.

12.When the solution is simple, God is answering.

13.God does not play dice with the universe.

14. God is subtle but he is not malicious.

15. A human being is a part of the whole, called by us Universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest-a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole nature in its beauty.

16. Nothing will benefit human health and increase the chances for survival of life on Earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet.

17. The man who regards his own life and that of his fellow creatures as meaningless is not merely unfortunate but almost disqualified for life.

18. Peace cannot be kept by force. It can only be achieved by understanding.

19. Only a life lived for others is a life worth while.

20. The human mind is not capable of grasping the Universe. We are like a little child entering a huge library. The walls are covered to the ceilings with books in many different tongues. The child knows that someone must have written these books. It does not know who or how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. But the child notes a definite plan in the arrangement of the books—a mysterious order which it does not comprehend, but only dimly suspects.

21. The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery every day. Never lose a holy curiosity.

22. What I see in Nature is a magnificent structure that we can comprehend only very imperfectly, and that must fill a thinking person with a feeling of humility. This is a genuinely religious feeling that has nothing to do with mysticism.

23. The finest emotion of which we are capable is the mystic emotion. Herein lies the germ of all art and all true science. Anyone to whom this feeling is alien, who is no longer capable of wonderment and lives in a state of fear is a dead man. To know that what is impenetrable for us really exists and manifests itself as the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, whose gross forms alone are intelligible to our poor faculties – this knowledge, this feeling … that is the core of the true religious sentiment. In this sense, and in this sense alone, I rank myself among profoundly religious men.

24. The real problem is in the hearts and minds of men. It is easier to denature plutonium than to denature the evil spirit of man.

25. True religion is real living; living with all one’s soul, with all one’s goodness and righteousness.

26. Intelligence makes clear to us the interrelationship of means and ends. But mere thinking cannot give us a sense of the ultimate and fundamental ends. To make clear these fundamental ends and valuations and to set them fast in the emotional life of the individual, seems to me precisely the most important function which religion has to form in the social life of man.